An ice-cold case

One of the podcasts I listen to regularly is Radiolab. Their latest tells the fascinating story of a man lost to the ages:

When hikers first found Ötzi (the nickname given to the body discovered in 1991), everyone assumed they'd stumbled upon an unfortunate mountaineering accident. But as the body was pulled from the ice, authorities started to suspect this wasn't a modern-day adventure gone wrong. It was, as producer Andy Mills explains, an OLD body. Really, really old.

Listen to it below or on their site.

Meli in Brussels

If you're old enough, you'll remember the Heysel area in Brussels before Bruparck and the Kinepolis cineplex.

After the universal exhibition of 1958, the owners of the Meli Amusement Park that was situated on the Belgian Coast (now Plopsaland) got permission to build a smaller version on part of the old exhibition grounds. That park lasted until the late eighties, when it was demolished to make way for Bruparck. The cycle seems to be repeating as Bruparck is now slated for demolition to make way for a new shopping, congress and business centre.

I came across a bunch of old postcards from the Heysel Meli Park, so I scanned them in and published them here. Enjoy.

Some reading

A fews interesting articles I read recently, they might appeal to you also:

The Poorest Rich Kids in the World

Raised by two drug addicts with virtually unlimited wealth, Georgia and Patterson survived a gilded childhood that was also a horror story of Dickensian neglect and abuse. They were globe-trotting trust-fund babies who snorkeled in Fiji, owned a pet lion cub and considered it normal to bring loose diamonds to elementary school for show and tell. And yet they also spent their childhoods inhaling freebase fumes, locked in cellars and deadbolted into their bedrooms at night in the secluded Wyoming mountains and on their ancestral South Carolina plantation.[…]

The Third Core’s Revenge

By the end of August 1945, there had been a total of three plutonium cores created in the entire world. Everyone knows about the first two. The first was put into the Gadget and detonated at Trinity in July 1945. The second was put into the Fat Man and detonated over Nagasaki in August 1945. The third, however, has been largely overlooked. […]

History and guilt

But my view of Tarantino changed profoundly as I watched Django Unchained the night it opened at my local cinema in Berlin. For the film is spiked with complex references that made clear how profoundly Tarantino had been influenced by German attempts to come to terms with the shame of its criminal past. […]

The future that never was

May 8th marked the 75th anniversary of the Hindenburg disaster. The Atlantic published an amazing photo album of the event.

Several of these pictures have a striking “alternate future” aura to them.

The Hindenburg floats past the Empire State Building over Manhattan on August 8, 1936, en route to Lakehurst, New Jersey, from Germany.

The Hindenburg floats past the Empire State Building over Manhattan on August 8, 1936, en route to Lakehurst, New Jersey, from Germany.

Interior of the lounge aboard the Hindenburg, where passenger windows could be opened.

Interior of the lounge aboard the Hindenburg, where passenger windows could be opened.